The Italian Campaign

Listing of Canadian Soldiers Buried in Italy

The Peace Through Valour Committee would like to thank the Commonwealth War Graves Commission for their help and support in identifying the names of the Canadian Soldiers buried in Italy and the cemeteries in which they rest.

There are a number of ways in which you can find information about a Soldier:

For a list of all soldiers buried in Italy please click here. The listing is an alphabetical list of cemeteries in Italy. Under each cemetery is an alphabetical list of all soldiers buried there. If you have a newer version of Word you can enter a name in the ‘search’ area at the top of the screen.

For a pdf version of the above list, please click here.

If you would like more information about the Commonwealth War Graves Commission please click here. Further search abilities are available on the CWGC web site.

The Cemeteries

agiraAgira Canadian War Cemetery
The 1st Canadian Infantry Division and the 1st Canadian Army Tank Brigade (both part of General Montgomery’s Eighth Army) sailed from the UK in June 1943 and landed in the south of Sicily July 10, along with their allies from the UK and the US. Agira was one of a number of Sicilian towns taken by the Canadians as they advanced northward across the mountains and over the island’s hot, barren terrain toward the Strait of Messina. …more

anconaAncona War Cemetery
In mid-1944, the Allies were driving to Arezzo – a strategic rail and road centre – en route to Florence, both located in central Italy west of Ancona. Tanks of the Ontario and Three Rivers regiments participated, as did New Zealand units. After the New Zealanders took the commanding mountain, Lignano, on July 15, 1944, the Germans retreated. They continued to withdraw, abandoning Ancona before the Poles entered it July 18. …more

argentaArgenta Gap War Cemetery
On 3 September 1943 the Allies invaded the Italian mainland, the invasion coinciding with an armistice made with the Italians who then re-entered the war on the Allied side. Following the fall of Rome to the Allies in June 1944, the German retreat became ordered and successive stands were made on a series of defensive lines. …more

assisi1Assisi War Cemetery
On 3 September 1943 the Allies invaded the Italian mainland, the invasion coinciding with an armistice made with the Italians who then re-entered the war on the Allied side. Progress through southern Italy was rapid despite stiff resistance, but the advance was checked for some months at the German winter defensive position known as the Gustav Line. The line eventually fell in May 1944 and as the Germans withdrew, Rome was taken by the Allies on 3 June. …more

bariBari War Cemetery
On 3 September 1943 the Allied invasion of the Italian mainland began with a landing in the south near Reggio and, a few days later, in the Gulf of Salerno. The invasion coincided with an armistice made with the Italians who then re-entered the war on the Allied side. Allied objectives were to draw German troops from the Russian front and more particularly from France, where an offensive was planned for the following year. The site of Bari War Cemetery was chosen in November 1943. …more

beachheadBeach Head War Cemetery
The Anzio landings were conducted early in the morning of January 22 by a combined British-American force under 6th U.S. Corps (Fifth Army) command. The enemy was evidently caught off-guard, for the port was found basically intact and resistance was, at least initially, light. There were only three German engineer companies and one panzer grenadier battalion defending 40 miles of coast here. …more

bolsenaBolsena War Cemetery
On 3 September 1943 the Allies invaded the Italian mainland, the invasion coinciding with an armistice made with the Italians who then re-entered the war on the Allied side. Progress through southern Italy was rapid despite stiff resistance, but the advance was checked for some months at the German winter defensive position known as the Gustav Line. The line eventually fell in May 1944 and as the Germans fell back, Rome was taken by the Allies on 3 June. …more

caserta

Caserta War Cemetery
On 3 September 1943 the Allies invaded the Italian mainland, the invasion coinciding with an armistice made with the Italians who then re-entered the war on the Allied side. Allied objectives were to draw German troops from the Russian front and more particularly from France, where an offensive was planned for the following year. …more

cassino

Cassino War Cemetery
Originally selected for a war cemetery in January 1944, the site was impossible to use until the fighting in this region subsided, as it did when the Germans withdrew five months later. As the area saw some of the fiercest action among the battles of the Italian campaign, the Cassino War Cemetery is the second largest Second World War cemetery in Italy. …more

cataniaCatania War Cemetery
The 1st Canadian Infantry Division and the 1st Canadian Army Tank Brigade (both part of General Montgomery’s Eighth Army) sailed from the U.K. in June 1943 and landed in the south of Sicily July 10 near Pachino, while their allies from the U.K. and the U.S. landed to the east and west. Opposition was light and so there were few casualties – the majority of them British gliders brought down by strong winds and anti-aircraft fire (60 of 140 gliders landed in the sea). Resistance, however, would increase the deeper the Allies penetrated into Sicily. …more

cesena

Cesena War Cemetery
On October 19, 1944, nearly one month after the Allies entered Rimini, the Allies found the town of Cesena likewise abandoned by the Germans. The enemy had wanted to withdraw two days earlier to prevent their being encircled by the Allies, but the German High Command insisted the town be held. The 200th Pazer Grenadier Regiment, unable to resist the Allied pressure, withdrew nonetheless, and established themselves behind the Savio River. …more

coriano

Coriano Ridge War Cemetery
To prevent the capture of Rimini, the Germans reinforced the surrounding region, particularly at Coriano Ridge, a feature that dominated the coastline and the approaches by land. The entire Canadian Corps had set out against the Adriatic sector with the ultimate aim of liberating Rimini in late August 1944. On the 25th, they crossed the Metauro River, one of half-a-dozen rivers in the path of the advance. On September 3rd, the Canadians set their sights on the ridge.  …more

florence

Florence War Cemetery
On 3 September 1943 the Allies invaded the Italian mainland, the invasion coinciding with an armistice made with the Italians who then re-entered the war on the Allied side. Following the fall of Rome to the Allies in June 1944, the German retreat was ordered and successive stands were made on a series of defensive positions known as the Trasimene, Arezzo, Arno and Gothic Lines.  …more

gradara

Gradara War Cemetery
By the end of August 1944, the Gothic Line had been breached and the Canadians were advancing beyond it. They now prepared to drive to the sea, with the 1st Division charged with scaling Monte Luro, a few kilometres south of Gradara, and then advancing through Gradara and the surrounding region to the coastal highway, Via Adriatica (Highway 16). …more

montecchio

Montecchio War Cemetery
The village of Montecchio was basically razed by the Germans so their field of fire could be clearly viewed. Ironically, it has since been rebuilt and has become a popular destination for German tourists. To break this end of the Gothic Line, the Canadians planned to attack from the banks of the Metauro River, several miles inland, to the coast. …more

moro

Moro River Canadian War Cemetery
By the winter of 1943 the German armies in Italy were defending a line stretching from the Tyrrhenian Sea north of Naples, to the Adriatic Sea south of Ortona. The Allies prepared to break through this line to capture Rome. For its part, the 1st Canadian Infantry Division was to cross the Moro River and take Ortona. …more

ravennaRavenna War Cemetery
On December 1, the Canadian Corps had returned to action, just as the heavier fighting was beginning. In the first three weeks of the month, the Canadians would participate in the liberation of Ravenna (December 4 – see Cesena War Cemetery), as well as four other towns, 30 villages, almost 1000 smaller communities, and three well-defended water lines within a nine-mile area. …more

rome

Rome War Cemetery
The Germans had built two strong lines of fortifications to defend their positions in Rome, the Gustav Line and the Adolf Hitler Line. The city was the ultimate objective of the Allied campaign in southern Italy. In late May 1944, after 24 hours of battling heavy resistance, the 1st Canadian Corps broke through the last of the two, the Hitler Line, and then, after difficult fighting, crossed the next barrier, the Melfa River. …more

sangro

Sangro River War Cemetery
On 3 September 1943 the Allies invaded the Italian mainland, the invasion coinciding with an armistice made with the Italians who then re-entered the war on the Allied side. Allied objectives were to draw German troops from the Russian front and more particularly from France, where an offensive was planned for the following year. Progress through southern Italy was rapid despite stiff resistance, but by the end of October, the Allies were facing the German winter defensive position known as the Gustav Line, which stretched from the river Garigliano in the west to the Sangro in the east. …more

villanova

Villanova War Cemetery
The 5th Canadian Armoured Division established a bridgehead over the Lamone River the night of December 10-11, 1944. In the days that followed, they became involved in heavy fighting to the west of it as they tried to make their way across three canals. …more

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